Mills' Message to Magazines

Here at Lumen, we're regular readers of Dominic Mills' weekly Mediatel article - Mills on Monday.
This week's article really caught our eye! 

 

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The article begins with a positive spin on the (until recently) bleak outlook of the Magazine Industry. 

I’m getting a clear sense that the magazine industry is at last clawing its way out of the door to nowhere, where the sign reads: "Help. Print is buggered and we don’t know what to do".

Mills' thought piece focuses on the importance of the print industry harnessing the power attention and emotion to drive encoding to the memory. Publishers armed with this knowledge, argues Mills, could change their fortunes.
 
Mills sites "The evidence of a new-found confidence was in plain sight at last week’s PPA Festival at Tobacco Dock."

Well, Mr Mills, not only do we agree, we've got the graphs to prove it!

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The graph illustrates two things:

  • Attention is clearly linked to recall
  • In comparison to digital, print is encoded very well indeed

You can read Mills' whole article Magazines: forget eyeballs, it's attention that matters here.

Although we disagree with the headline - don't forget about eyeballs, just measure them properly!


Is viewability giving you a headache?

Is viewability giving you a headache?

We came across a great article in Adweek which delves into why brands such as IBM, Nestle and HP are already changing the viewability landscape.

It states that John Murphy, head of marketplace quality at OpenX, sees brands now making their own viewability standards “because they feel the MRC’s definition is the lowest-common-denominator standard.” Murphy says “I would certainly encourage the MRC to do a reset and take another look given where the industry is now versus where they were when the definition was originally established".

Obviously this has a knock on effect to the world of programmatic as one-size-fits-all becomes even further out of reach. 

Lauren Johnson of AdWeek writes that Open X “is worried that custom viewability metrics will change the fundamental technology behind programmatic advertising.”

We at Lumen have built an entire business researching this very thing.  Our findings go way beyond the conjecture of viewability and instead provide hard facts about what actually captures people’s attention.  We know that viewability doesn’t mean viewed.  This allows us to make solid, actionable recommendations on how you can optimise your communications and improve your bottom line.

If you feel the MRC viewability standards aren’t quite giving your brand the cut-through it deserves, come and have a chat with us.

'The Wrap' Improves Site Dwell Time Using Contextual Video Ads

The Wrap, with the help of Lumen Research, was able to test the impact of contextual video ads vs non-related video advertising. Engagement increased by 42% and brand perceptions improved: The Wrap created a more significant experience for its users, which led to higher attention levels.

Are you a publisher looking to improve your audience’s experience and engagement on your site?  Or an advertiser keen to optimise the level of attention your ads receive?  Get in touch.

Sorry seems to be the hardest word

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Apologising is an art. KFC’s justly-famous FCK ad is just about the perfect apology ad, and we have the attention data to prove it. But what do they get right that others get wrong? Download our free report to compare KFC’s success to a points failure from Southern Rail. 

 

 

Lumen wins top prize at Mobile World Congress

Lumen was awarded first prize at the #EU_EIC #SMEInstrument Innovation event, part of Mobile World Congress held this week in Barcelona. 

79 high-potential innovators from 17 different countries participated, with a shortlist of 12 who were asked to pitch in front of a jury of 14 leading investors. 

And Lumen won. Which was nice. The judges were impressed by the 'truly disruptive' nature of our approach, and the simplicity of how we solve a large and pressing problem. 

If you want to find out more about the reality of attention, or want to start buying attention, download the white paper we have put together with our friends at Avocet, the innovation dsp.

Lumen was awarded first prize at the #EU_EIC #SMEInstrument Innovation event, part of Mobile World Congress held this week in Barcelona. 

79 high-potential innovators from 17 different countries participated, with a shortlist of 12 who were asked to pitch in front of a jury of 14 leading investors. 

And Lumen won. Which was nice. The judges were impressed by the 'truly disruptive' nature of our approach, and the simplicity of how we solve a large and pressing problem. 

If you want to find out more about the reality of attention, or want to start buying attention, download the white paper we have put together with our friends at Avocet, the innovation dsp.

 

What makes car advertising different?

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On Wednesday, we were at the Magnetic Motors Briefing, where some of data on the power of context was being presented. But it got us thinking about what makes car advertising special. So we’ve put together a short report about the idiosyncrasies of car advertising, which can be downloaded below. 

We know that attention is finite, rare and valuable. But how do you act on these insights? Lumen has embedded our predictions into Avocet, the innovation DSP, allowing you to identify and invest behind ads that are likely to get looked at as they become available.

And attention pays. Ads that pass our ‘effective attention’ threshold are significantly likely to convert to sales. We’ve written up our findings in an exclusive feature with Campaign which can be found on our website

 

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How to align your media buying strategy with consumer attention for higher brand recall and ROI

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We know that attention is finite, rare and valuable. But how do you act on these insights? Lumen has embedded our predictions into Avocet, the innovation DSP, allowing you to identify and invest behind ads that are likely to get looked at as they become available.

And attention pays. Ads that pass our ‘effective attention’ threshold are significantly likely to convert to sales. We’ve written up our findings in an exclusive feature with Campaign and made a report.

Download the report to learn: 

  • How to measure attention
  • Predicting attention trends

  • Ways to interpret attention data effectively
  • How to win the battle for attention

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Faster. Higher. Stronger.

We were over in Brussels this week, giving a talk at the CommPass Media Vision conference. One of the charts we presented got us thinking about what distinguishes the best performing websites in terms of advertising attention. What does it take to win gold in the Attention Olympics?

For some time now, we have been highlighting that the key to success is as much to do with viewable time as size or context of advertising. The longer an ad can be seen, the more likely it is to be noticed, and the longer it will be looked at for.

But there’s more to it than that. As you can see below, ads on high performing sites not only get noticed more – but they get noticed sooner. Newsbrands make a particularly good example. Not only do people notice the ads more and look at them for longer – but it takes them less time to get noticed. The attention higher, and the results stronger, but it all happens much faster. Altius, Fortius, but also Citius, as it says on the gold medals.

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Why is this? We have three theories. It could be down to direct programmatic. Buying direct from publishers means that it takes less time for ads to load, which means that they are viewable sooner than those sold via other technology.

But let’s not slag off intermediary ad tech too much. Better ad tech in general may also be having an effect. Major newsbrands can afford invest in better sell-side technology, or partner with the best buy-side providers, than other, lesser sites. This means that ads even the remnant inventory will be served quicker and more consistently than other sites. This may be having an impact their relative ‘velocity of attention’.  

And finally, it might be down to the power of design. We’ve said before that quality journalism leads to longer dwell times, and so better results. But it looks like quality site design means that ads are getting noticed quicker. Good UX means that ads are positioned in prominent locations, and surrounded by negative space, which accentuates their attention-grabbing powers. The simple, elegant design of many newsbrand websites contrasts with the busyness of other sites, where even viewable ads can be lost amidst the clutter.

In the ancient Olympics, there were prizes not only for the fastest runners or highest jumpers, but also for the most affecting artists. It seems that to win the modern Attention Olympics, there’s a role for both brawn and beauty.

Facebook beats YouTube for most noticed advertising this November - with BT.com third

New research from Lumen has crowned Facebook as the site with the most noticeable advertising for November. Eye tracking data from the Lumen panel reveals that 54% of viewable ads on Facebook were in fact viewed, while 42% of YouTube ads were actually looked at. Both sites significantly outperformed the digital display average of 18%.

Our Panelists receive nectar card points for undertaking tasks, but have the opportunity to earn more if they leave their eye tracking devices on whilst naturally browsing. This gives us a wealth of information on what sites people visit, for how long and when ads are noticed and where.

So, what has driven all this attention to Facebook’s advertising? Firstly, people spend a lot of time on Facebook: average dwell time per page sits at around 6 minutes. And it’s not just the length of time that matters here, it’s the quality of the time. You’d be surprised to know, people really are interested in their own Facebook feeds: they are fully in discover mode, on the lookout for posts that interest them.  

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Secondly, the majority of Facebook’s advertising is in-line with content. Instead of trying to disrupt the viewing experience, working with it by using in-line ads can lead to not just a greater number of viewable ads, but also more viewed ads. 

Up next was Youtube. Similarly to Facebook, viewability teetered around the 30% mark (31.4%), of which 42% of ads were seen. This, again, is a staggering performance for digital advertising. But could they perform even better? The majority of YouTube’s advertising is pre-roll, where the ad is played before the videos viewers want to watch. Which essentially means people have to watch the ad (for at least 5s) before they get to watch their video. But 58% of people are actively avoiding this advertising, which shows how making people look doesn’t mean to say they will look.  

Bronze medal this month goes to BT. BT have proved that you don’t need to be a tech giant to know what you are doing with digital advertising. A well-designed, clean and clutter-free homepage has ensured almost a quarter of viewable ads were noticed, often for long enough to take home key messages. 

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So, well done Facebook. But also, well done BT, for showing us you don’t need to be a tech giant to generate attention to advertising.

Get in touch to receive document on implications of these findings for publishers and media buyers.


Get in touch with us to test your own, we'd love to hear from you!

Time Budgets

OOH: what posters can teach digital about time budgets

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If you are paid to make advertising then you often find advertising very interesting – especially your own. You stare at it, interrogate it, read the small print and check the details. If you’re a digital advertiser, you watch and re-watch your creations to make sure that every frame is perfect and that it leads to exactly the right landing page. And well you might, it’s what pays your mortgage.

This is not normal. You are weird. Most people ignore most ads – even the ones made by you. Data from the Lumen panel shows that online, only 18% of the ads that people could see ever actually get noticed. And if they do engage with advertising, they do so far more fleetingly than you might imagine. The average time spent engaging with a digital ad is 1.2 seconds (2.2 seconds for the average print ad). Only 5% of digital ads get looked at for more than 1 second. People don’t READ advertising. They LOOK at it. Big difference.

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This leaves marketers with a choice. Firstly, you can issue a challenge to your agency. Summoning your inner King Canute, you clear your throat and imperiously decree: ‘Make me an ad that people want to look at for 30 seconds!’. That might work: John Lewis seem to make a pretty good fist of it. But equally, it might end up with an emperor’s new clothes situation: agencies just telling you what you want to hear, even when they know it’s ridiculous.

Alternatively, you could match your creative to your ‘time budget’. Sure, people could ogle your creative for hours on end, but in reality they only look for a couple of seconds. If that’s how most people actually engage with ads, the question becomes: what can I say in a couple of seconds? How can I simplify my message to fill the time allotted?

This is not a new problem. The out-of-home (OOH) industry has been grappling with this for centuries. Theoretically, people could stop and stare at posters for as long as they like. Occasionally, this might even happen – with unexpected results. But we all know that most of the time they don’t. Instead, we challenge creative to get the message over in a single sentence or compelling image. To make a picture worth a thousand words. To keep it simple, stupid.


New media marketers have a lot to learn from the oldest media of them all. Just because you have a lot to say doesn’t mean that your audience has a lot of time to listen. People don’t have to engage if they don’t want to – and frequently they don’t. It’s up to us to fit into their lives and earn their attention.

Get in touch with us to test your own, we'd love to hear from you!